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Andrew Owen

Unit 27

Compound Words

     201.  A number of compounds may be obtained by joining brief forms:

Compound Words

202.  Key to Compound Words

any: anybody, anyone, anywhere, anyhow, anyway.
be: before, beforehand, behindhand, belong, beside, besides.
ever-y: whatever, whenever, whichever, however, whoever, everybody, everyone, everywhere.
here: hereafter, herein, hereinafter, hereinbefore, hereon, hereto, heretofore, hereunto, herewith.
there: thereafter, therein, therefore, therefrom, thereon, thereto, thereupon, therewith.
where: whereabouts, whereas, whatever, wherefore, wherein, whereof, whereon, elsewhere.
soever: whatsoever, wheresoever, whensoever, whosoever, whomsoever.
some: somebody, somehow, someone, sometime, somewhat, somewhere.
with: within, withstand, forthwith, notwithstanding.

     Note: Slight modifications or omissions are made in the forms for anywhere, anyhow, hereinafter, herewith, however, sometime, somewhere, and the compounds beginning with every.  These should receive special attention.  The form for notwithstanding is not-with-s.

203.  Irregular Compounds

meanwhile, otherwise, thanksgiving

Figures, Etc.

     204.  After numerals the word dollars is expressed by d; hundred by n placed under the numeral; thousand by th; million by m placed on the line close to the numeral; billion by b; pounds (weight or money) by p; gallons by g; barrels by br; bushels by bsh; feet by f; francs by fr; euros by eu; cwt. by nw; o'clock by o placed over the numeral:

Figures

     *The sign for hundred is placed beneath the figure to distinguish it positively from million, which is written beside the figure.

Other figure endings

     205.  The above signs may be used after the article a and such words as per, few, and several:

a dollar, several hundred, etc.

     206.  Cents when preceded by dollars may be expressed by writing the figures representing them very small and above the numerals for the dollars; when not preceded by dollars, the sign for s is placed above the figures.  Percent is expressed by s written below the figures; percent per annum by adding n to percent.

Expression of cents and per cents

207.  Reading and Dictation Practice

Reading and Dictation Practice

208. Writing Practice

     1. A few thousand dollars will be needed to begin the repairs on the bridge at Omaha. It is estimated that the total cost will be about $50,000.
     2. Owing to the strike, the goods are coming through in very poor condition, and many of the shipments must be refused.
     3. A trial of the peculiar device showed that it was not capable of developing even approximately the power claimed for it.
     4 We are anxious to be invited to the private view of this new establishment, and especially of its elaborate and conspicuously beautiful decorations.
     5. We are somewhat accustomed to abbreviating words in writing the English language in longhand. This expedient is especially applicable and convenient in
writing rapidly. The principle is capable of great development and offers a ready means of providing easy forms for many long words that would otherwise require more elaborate and consequently Less fluent outlines.
     6. In the Post Office Guide it is suggested that in addressing envelopes the name of the state, written on a line by itself, is more convenient in handling the mail.
     7. A peculiar situation has arisen that is likely to prejudice the development and policy of this financial institution.
     8. The Reverend Mr. Smith took a conspicuously benevolent attitude toward a policy that was not likely to be successful.
     9. A regular feature of the establishment was the inauguration of a fashion show each month.

Transcription Key to this Unit
- Next Unit -

Preface
About Gregg Shorthand
Editor's Note
A Talk with the Beginner
The Alphabet
Chapter I
   Unit 1
   Unit 2
   Unit 3
Chapter II
   Unit 4
   Unit 5
   Unit 6
Chapter III
   Unit 7
   Unit 8
   Unit 9
Chapter IV
   Unit 10
   Unit 11
   Unit 12
Chapter V
   Unit 13
   Unit 14
   Unit 15
Chapter VI
   Unit 16
   Unit 17
   Unit 18
Chapter VII
   Unit 19
   Unit 20
   Unit 21
Chapter VIII
   Unit 22
   Unit 23
   Unit 24
Chapter IX
   Unit 25
   Unit 26
   Unit 27
Chapter X
   Unit 28
   Unit 29
   Unit 30
Chapter XI
   Unit 31
   Unit 32
   Unit 33
Chapter XII
   Unit 34
   Unit 35
   Unit 36

Index

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